NSRN Annual Lecture 2015: Outline of a Theory of Religious-Secular Competition

We are delighted to announce our 2015 Annual Lecture, presented in cooperation with the Department of Social Anthropology & Cultural Studies (ISEK) at the University of Zurich, and the Emmy Noether-project “The Diversity of Nonreligion.”

Outline of a Theory of Religious-Secular Competition

Prof. Dr. Jörg Stolz (University of Lausanne)

Thursday, November 12, 2015, 6pm

Venue: University of Zurich (UZH) Oerlikon Campus Andreasstr. 15, 8050 Zurich Room: AND 3.02/06 (3rd floor)

A flyer can be downloaded here (pdf).

NSRN Annual Lecture

CFP: Secularism and Secularity – American Academy of Religion (AAR) Annual Meeting

CFP: Secularism and Secularity – American Academy of Religion  (AAR) Annual Meeting

Over the course of the last few decades, theoretical reappraisals of the secular have tried in a variety of ways to destabilize and revalue the notion of the secular so that it no longer means simply the “absence of religion.” Yet vernacular uses of the secular frequently continue to orbit around that very understanding. With this in mind, we invite proposals for papers or panels that explore “the secular” at its various sites of construction. In concert with this year’s conference theme, we are particularly interested in proposals that critically engage public understandings of secularism as well as those that investigate the constitution of the secular in religiously plural publics, in multiple identity formations (especially among the so-called religious “nones”), and in and through a range of social practices (for example, those related to death and dying). In addition, for a possible cosponsored session with the Death, Dying, and Beyond Group, we seek proposals on secular approaches to death.

To submit a paper proposal please follow the instructions on the AAR website found here. All proposals must be submitted no later than March 1 March 4, 2013.

Questions can be directed to the program unit co-chairs (Per Smith and Jonathan VanAntwerpen) at secularism.secularity@gmail.com

UPDATE – The AAR has extended its deadline for proposals to Monday, March 4th.

CFP: Is the Post-Colonial Secular?

Conference in Syracuse, NY
September 20-21, 2013

Description and Call for Papers:

Across the humanities, critical scholarship on the secular / secularism / secularization has recently ballooned. Scholars of history, anthropology, political theory, and religion have begun revisiting questions of enchantment and disenchantment, political theology, blasphemy, religious freedom, and much more. Charles Taylor’s A Secular Age in particular has garnered wide attention, but Taylor’s narrative focuses on the disenchantment of modern Christian Europe. Before and after A Secular Age, scholars have probed the boundaries of the secular beyond Christian Europe, and beyond the confines of intellectual history.

Some have asserted that the ideologies of secularism and colonialism are deeply intertwined. Others have asserted that post-colonial religiosity remains a symptom of colonial control of reason and affect. Still others have pointed to neo-liberalism as the shared basis of contemporary racial, religious, and post-colonial regimes.

We invite proposals that probe the question, “Is the Post-Colonial Post-Secular?” Projects may employ methods of history, literary criticism, theoretical reflection, ethnography, or cultural studies. We are interested in projects from a variety of regions and periods, for example contemporary Africa, the early U.S., or nineteenth century Haiti.

Please send 300 word abstracts, or questions, to: Owais Khan (mokhan01@syr.edu) and Vincent Lloyd (vwlloyd@syr.edu).
Deadline for abstracts: March 25; Notification: April 10.

CONFIRMED SPEAKERS: 
Gauri Viswanathan (Columbia, Literature)
Barnor Hesse (Northwestern, African American Studies)
Pamela Klassen (Toronto, Religion)
Uday Mehta (CUNY, Political Science)
Matthew Engelke (LSE, Anthropology)
Gyanendra Pandey (Emory, History)
Ludger Viefhues-Bailey (Philosophy, Le Moyne)

This symposium is sponsored by the Syracuse University Religion Department in cooperation with Le Moyne College.

Events: Forum on Religion Audra Mitchell and Stacey Gutkowski

Forum on Religion Seminar

Date: 23 January 2013
Time: 16.30-18.00
Venue: Seligman Library (OLD 6.05), Old Building, LSE

Speakers:
Audra Mitchell (University of York)
‘Bringing Secularity (Back) into International Relations: Immanence, Agency and Intervention’

and

Stacey Gutkowski (King’s College, London)
‘Secular Ways of War’

58 New Additions to the NSRN Bibliography

It may be Christmas Eve, but we have just added 58 new items to our ever-growing bibliography. They are pasted in below for your perusal.

If you notice any omissions or errors in the bibliography, please do not hesitate to get in touch with Chris.

  • Alicino, F. “Western Secularism in an Age of Religious Diversity.” International Review of Sociology 22, no. 2 (2012): 305–322.
  • Ardagh, D. “Secular, Theistic and Religious Ethical Rationales for the Relief of Extreme Poverty.” Australian Journal of Professional and Applied Ethics 12, no. 1; /2 (2010): 40–54.
  • Bekke-Hansen, S., C.G. Pedersen, K. Thygesen, S. Christensen, L.C. Waelde, and R. Zachariae. “Faith and Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine Among Heart Attack Patients in a Secular Society.” Complementary Therapies in Medicine 20, no. 5 (2012): 306–315.
  • Billig, Michael. Banal Nationalism. London: SAGE, 1995.
  • Boeve, L. “Religious Education in a Post-secular and post-Christian Context.” Journal of Beliefs and Values 33, no. 2 (2012): 143–156.
  • Bowie, B. “Human Rights Education and the Post Secular Turn.” Journal of Beliefs and Values 33, no. 2 (2012): 195–205.
  • Bowie, B., A. Peterson, and L. Revell. “Editorial : Post-secular Trends: Issues in Education and Faith.” Journal of Beliefs and Values 33, no. 2 (2012): 139–141.
  • Bronk, A. “Secular, Secularization, and Secularism. A Review Article.” Anthropos 107, no. 2 (2012): 578–582.
  • Brown, Callum G. “Podcast: The People of No Religion.” The Religious Studies Project, December 19, 2012. http://www.religiousstudiesproject.com/brown/.
  • Bryan, H. “Reconstructing the Teacher as a Post Secular Pedagogue : a Consideration of the New Teachers’ Standards.” Journal of Beliefs and Values 33, no. 2 (2012): 217–228.
  • Burley, M. “Atheism and the Gift of Death.” Religious Studies 48, no. 4 (2012): 533–546.
  • Cahaner, L., and Y. Mansfield. “A Voyage from Religiousness to Secularity and Back : a Glimpse into `Haredi’ Tourists.” Journal of Heritage Tourism 7, no. 4 (2012): 301–321.
  • Carr, D. “Post-secularism, Religious Knowledge and Religious Education.” Journal of Beliefs and Values 33, no. 2 (2012): 157–168.
  • Castelli, M. “Faith Dialogue as a Pedagogy for a Post Secular Religious Education.” Journal of Beliefs and Values 33, no. 2 (2012): 207–216.
  • Connelly, Louise, Christopher R. Cotter, Frans Jespers, Ethan Gjerset Quillen, Steven J. Sutcliffe, and Teemu Taira. “Podcast: Studying Nonreligion Within Religious Studies.” The Religious Studies Project, December 17, 2012. http://www.religiousstudiesproject.com/2012/12/17/podcast-studying-nonreligion-within-religious-studies/.
  • Cornelissen, T., and U. Jirjahn. “Religion and Earnings : Is It Good to Be an Atheist with Religious Parental Background?” Economics Letters 117, no. 3 (2012): 905–908.
  • Cotter, Christopher R. “Secular Sacreds and the Sacred Secular.” The Religious Studies Project (November 7, 2012). http://www.religiousstudiesproject.com/2012/11/07/christopher-r-cotter-secular-sacreds/.
  • La Cour, P., and P. Gotke. “Understanding of the Word “Spirituality’’ by Theologians Compared to Lay People : An Empirical Study from a Secular Region.” Journal of Health Care Chaplaincy 18, no. 3–4 (2012): 97–109.
  • Daly, E. “The Ambiguous Reach of Constitutional Secularism in Republican France : Revisiting the Idea of Laicite and Political Liberalism as Alternatives.” Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 32, no. 3 (2012): 583–608.
  • Davie, Grace. “Podcast: Belief and Unbelief: Two Sides of a Coin.” The Religious Studies Project, December 19, 2012. http://www.religiousstudiesproject.com/davie/.
  • Van Die, M. “Secularism and Freedom of Conscience.” Journal of Church and State 54, no. 4 (2012): 648–650.
  • Eccles, Janet. “The Religious and Non-Religious Commitments of Older Women in the UK: Towards a New Typology.” Journal of Contemporary Religion 27, no. 3 (2012): 469–484. doi:10.1080/13537903.2012.722296.
  • Forbes, K.F., and E.M. Zampelli. “The Impacts of Religion, Political Ideology, and Social Capital on Religious and Secular Giving : Evidence from the 2006 Social Capital Community Survey.” Applied Economics 45, no. 17 (2013): 2481–2490.
  • Fox, J. “The Last Bastion of Secularism? Government Religion Policy in Western Democracies, 1990 to 2008.” Journal of Contemporary European Studies 20, no. 2 (2012): 161–180.
  • Francis, L.J., G. Penny, and S. Baker. “Defining and Assessing Spiritual Health : A Comparative Study Among 13- to 15-Year-Old Pupils Attending Secular Schools, Anglican Schools, and Private Christian Schools in England and Wales.” Peabody Journal of Education 87, no. 3 (2012): 351–367.
  • Garral, M.D. “The Possibility of Agnosticism : Russell’s Retreat from Atheism.” International Philosophical Quarterly 52, no. 3(207) (2012): 355–372.
  • Georgellis, Y., and T. Lange. “Traditional Versus Secular Values and the Job-Life Satisfaction Relationship Across Europe.” British Journal of Management 23, no. 4 (2012): 437–454.
  • Gul, A. “Egyptian Muslims Should Embrace Secularism.” New Perspectives Quarterly 29, no. 3 (2012): 48–51.
  • Gutkowski, Stacey. “Secularism and the Politics of Risk: Britain’s Prevent Agenda, 2005-8.” International Relations 25, no. 3 (2011): 346–362.
  • Haldane, J. “Scientism and Its Challenge to Humanism.” New Blackfriars 93, no. 1048 (2012): 671–686.
  • Hunter, I. “Charles Taylor’s A Secular Age and Secularization in Early Modern Germany.” Modern Intellectual History 8, no. 3 (2011): 621–646.
  • Iqtidar, Humeira. “Podcast: Secularization and Non-religion in Non-Western Contexts.” The Religious Studies Project, December 19, 2012. http://www.religiousstudiesproject.com/iqtidar/.
  • ———. “Secularism and Secularisation : Untying the Knots.” Economic and Political Weekly 47, no. 35 (2012): 50–58.
  • Joukovsky, N.A. “Robert Parker’s `Letters on Atheism’ : An Early Response to Shelley’s The Necessity of Atheism.” Review of English Studies 63, no. 261 (2012): 608–633.
  • Kim, D., D. McCalman, and D. Fisher. “The Sacred/Secular Divide and the Christian Worldview.” Journal of Business Ethics 109, no. 2 (2012): 203–208.
  • Kim, Y.I., and W.B. Wilcox. “Bonding Alone : Familism, Religion, and Secular Civic Participation.” Social Science Research 42, no. 1 (2013): 31–45.
  • Lanman, Jonathan. “Podcast: Atheism Explained: The Evolutionary Origins of Atheistic Thought.” The Religious Studies Project, December 19, 2012. http://www.religiousstudiesproject.com/lanman/.
  • Lee, Lois. “Being Secular: Toward Separate Sociologies of Secularity, Nonreligion and Epistemological Culture.” Unpublished PhD Thesis, University of Cambridge, 2012.
  • ———. “Podcast: Lois Lee on Nonreligion.” The Religious Studies Project, October 8, 2012. http://www.religiousstudiesproject.com/2012/10/08/podcast-lois-lee-on-non-religion/.
  • Leurs, R. “Are Faith-based Organisations Distinctive? Comparing Religious and Secular NGOs in Nigeria.” Development in Practice 22, no. 5; /6 (2012): 704–720.
  • Lust, E., G. Soltan, and J. Wichmann. “After the Arab Spring : Islamism, Secularism, and Democracy.” CURRENT HISTORY -NEW YORK THEN PHILADELPHIA- 111, no. 749 (2012): 362–364.
  • Majeed, J. “THE CRISIS OF SECULARISM IN INDIA.” Modern Intellectual History 7, no. 3 (2010): 653–666.
  • Martinez-Taboas, A., N. Varas-Diaz, D. Lopez-Garay, and L. Hernandez-Pereiera. “What Every Psychologists Practitioner Should Know About Atheist People and Atheism.” Interamerican Journal of Psychology 45, no. 2 (2011): 203–210.
  • Mirman, M.C. “An Atheist’s Guide to the Divine : Throwing Out the Bathwater but Keeping the Baby.” Research in the Social Scientific Study of Religion 23 (2012): 171–190.
  • Moser, P.K. “Undermining the Case for Evidential Atheism.” Religious Studies 48, no. 1 (2012): 83–93.
  • Osuri, G. “Secular Interventions/Hinduized Sovereignty : (Anti) Conversion and Religious Pluralism in Jodhaa Akbar.” Cultural Critique no. 81 (2012): 70–102.
  • Petersen, J.A. “Religion and Popular Music in Europe : New Expressions of Sacred and Secular Identity.” Culture and Religion 13, no. 3 (2012): 393–395.
  • Pingle, M., and T. Melkonyan. “To Believe or Not Believe…or Not Decide : A Decision-theoretic Model of Agnosticism.” Rationality and Society 24, no. 4 (2012): 408–441.
  • Quack, Johannes. “Is to Ignore to Deny? Säkularisierung, Säkularität Und Säkularismus in Indien.” In Religionspolitik, Öffentlichkeit, Wissenschaft: Studien Zur Neuformierung Von Religion in Der Gegenwart, edited by Martin Bauman and Frank Neubert, 291–317. Zürich: PANO-Verlag, 2010.
  • Radford, M. “Faith and Reason in a Post Secular Age.” Journal of Beliefs and Values 33, no. 2 (2012): 229–240.
  • Rectenwald, Michael. “Secularism and the Cultures of Nineteenth-century Scientific Naturalism.” The British Journal for the History of Science FirstView (2012): 1–24. doi:10.1017/S0007087412000738.
  • Shneer, D., and B. Springer. “Russian Jewish Intellectual History and the Making of Secular Jewish Culture.” Modern Intellectual History 9, no. 2 (2012): 435–449.
  • Siegler, E. “David Cronenberg : The Secular Auteur as Critic of Religion.” Journal of the American Academy of Religion 80, no. 4 (2012): 1098–1112.
  • Tonti-Filippini, N. “Religious and Secular Death: A Parting of the Ways.” Bioethics 26, no. 8 (2012): 410–421.
  • West, J.A. “The Post-Secular in Question : Religion in Contemporary Society.” Sociology of Religion 73, no. 3 (2012): 352–354.
  • Wilcox, M.M. ““Spiritual Sluts’’ : Uncovering Gender, Ethnicity, and Sexuality in the Post-Secular.” Womens Studies 41, no. 6 (2012): 639–659.
  • Wohlrab-Sahr, Monika. “Podcast: Multiple Secularities: Toward a Cultural Sociology of Secular-Religious Distinctions.” The Religious Studies Project, December 19, 2012. http://www.religiousstudiesproject.com/iqtidar/.
  • Woodhead, Linda. “Podcast: The Secularization Thesis.” The Religious Studies Project, April 16, 2012. http://www.religiousstudiesproject.com/2012/04/16/podcast-linda-woodhead-on-the-secularisation-thesis/.

New Book Series: Histories of the Sacred and the Secular, 1700 – 2000

Histories of the Sacred and the Secular, 1700 – 2000. Edited by David Nash, Oxford Brookes University, UK

Histories of the Sacred and the Secular (pdf flyer)

Histories of the Sacred and the Secular 1700 – 2000 reflects the awakened and expanding
profile of the history of religion within the academy in recent years. Intending to publish
exciting new and high quality work on the history of religion and belief since 1700, the series
actively encourages the production of interdisciplinary proposals and the use of innovative
methodologies. We welcome book proposals on the history of Atheism, Secularism,
Humanism and unbelief/secularity and encourage research agendas in this area alongside
those in religious belief, as well as proposals covering subjects in Britain, Europe, the United
States and Oceania. Histories of the Sacred and the Secular 1700 – 2000 aims to reflect both
the work of new scholars entering the field, alongside the work of established scholars.

Editorial Board

Professor Callum Brown, Dundee University, UK
Professor William Gibson, Oxford Brookes University, UK
Dr Carole Cusack, Sydney University, Australia
Professor Beverley Clack, Oxford Brookes University, UK
Drs Bert Gasenbeek, University of Humanistic Studies, Utrecht, Netherlands
Professor Paul Harvey, University of Colorado at Colorado Springs, USA

for more details of the series or guidelines on
submitting a proposal contact the general Editor:

Professor David Nash
dsnash@brookes.ac.uk

http://www.palgrave.com

CFP: Religion and Citizenship: Re-Thinking the Boundaries of Religion and the Secular.

Socrel / HEA Teaching and Studying Religion, 2nd Annual Symposium

The 2012 Socrel / HEA Teaching and Studying Religion symposium will explore the theme: Religion and Citizenship: Re-Thinking the Boundaries of Religion and the Secular.

The symposium is organised by Socrel, the BSA Sociology of Religion Study Group, with funding from the Higher Education Academy, Philosophy, and Religious Studies Subject Centre. Last year’s inaugural symposium was over-subscribed and therefore early submissions are encouraged.

Keynote speaker: Dr Nasar Meer, Northumbria University

Venue: BSA Meeting Room, Imperial Wharf, London
Date: 13 December 2012
10 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Religions today are implicated in a wide variety of publics. From contests over the environment and democracy to protests against capitalism, religions remain important factors in political and public life across diverse, and interconnected, global contexts. A variety of diverse responses have been articulated to the so-called ‘return of religion’ in the public sphere, drawing into question relations between the religious, the non-religious and the secular. As scholars have developed new theoretical understandings of the terms of these debates and questioned how these are bound up with cultural conceptualizations of citizenship, education – in schools, universities and less formal educational contexts – has often been a site where contestations of the religious and the secular have been acutely felt.

The aim of this symposium is to consider the interrelation between conceptions of the religious, the secular, citizenship and education, and to explore how these issues affect the study of religion in higher education. We hope to attract presentations of sufficient quality to lead to an edited publication.

The day will be highly participative and engaged. The symposium will be organised as a single stream so that the day is as much about discussion as it is about presentation, and therefore the number of formal papers will be limited.

Papers are invited from students, teachers, and researchers in the disciplines of sociology, anthropology, geography, theology, history, psychology, political science, religious studies and others where religion is taught and studied. Empirical, methodological, and theoretical papers are welcomed.

Presenters will circulate a five-page summary of their paper before the day so that all participants can come prepared for discussion. Presentations will last 10 minutes and will be structured into three sessions, each followed by a discussant drawing out key points. The day will conclude with a discussant-led, focused panel discussion.

Key questions to be addressed may include, but are not limited to:

  • What are the relationships between the religious, the secular and the public sphere, and how do these affect the study of religion, in both universities and schools?
  • How do different historical constructions of religion and secularity shape understandings of the civil sphere and citizenship, and what are the implications of this for the study of religion?
  • Does the increased public visibility of religion in national and global contexts affect how we study it?
  • What is the role of religious education (school and/or university) in forming citizens and shaping understandings of citizenship?
  • Are there distinct regional, national or international conceptions of the secular?
  • Are there distinct regional, national or international conceptions of citizenship?
  • How do different disciplines approach and study these conceptions, and what are the advantages and disadvantages of these approaches?

Abstracts of 200 words are invited by September 15 2012. Please send these to: Dr Paul-François Tremlett p.f.tremlett@open.ac.uk

Costs: £36.00 for BSA/SocRel members; £45.00 for non-members; £20.00 for SocRel/BSA Postgraduate members; £25.00 for Postgraduate non-members.

 

CFP: Kongress “Rethinking Europe with(out) Religion” nächsten Februar in Wien

International Congress: Rethinking Europe with(out) religion. Deadline for abstracts 30 September 2012

Full details as PDF can be found here CFP_Rethinking Europe with(out) Religion

Sehr geehrte Interessierte an der Forschungsplattform RaT! Liebe Kolleginnen und Kollegen!

Die Forschungsplattform „Religion and Transformation in Contemporary European Society“ (RaT) möchte Sie hiermit auf den im Februar 2013 stattfindenden Kongress „Rethinking Europe with(out) Religion“ aufmerksam machen.
Details sowie ein Anmeldeformular finden Sie auf der Kongress-Homepage: http://www.rethinkingeurope.at

Die Kolleginnen und Kollegen an Universitäten und Bildungseinrichtungen bitte ich, diese Information im Rahmen der Ihnen zur Verfügung stehenden Möglichkeiten weiterzuleiten. Bitte machen Sie Studierende auf diesen Kongress aufmerksam! Für alle Fälle hänge ich den CfP an.
Mit freundlichen Grüßen und allen guten Wünschen für einen erholsamen Sommer!

Angelika Walser

Dr. Angelika Walser
Plattformmanagerin
RaT (Religion and Transformation
In Contemporary European Society)
Schenkenstr. 8-10
1010 Wien
T.: 0664-60277-23803

Beschreibung: RaT_Logo

CFP: Religion and Politics in a Post-Secular World: Telos conference in New York City, Feb 16-17, 2013

Deadline for CFP October 15, 2012.
Religion and Politics in a Post-Secular World: The Sixth Annual Telos Conference in New York City, February 16-17, 2013
The 21st century has been marked by both events and reflections that have explicitly challenged the long-standing liberal project of maintaining a separation between religion and politics. Not only have political conflicts become inseparable from theological and metaphysical considerations, but standard liberal claims of value-neutrality have been undermined by insights into the theological presuppositions of secular institutions. The goal of the 2013 Telos Conference will be to investigate the changing relationship between religion and politics.

Possible topics include secularization and the “post-secular” turn; the theological foundations of political systems such as liberalism, socialism, and fascism; political theology; religion and the public sphere; separation of church and state; new civil forms of religious practice; the politics of religious pluralism; myth and sovereignty; theology and modernity; religion and political values; theocracy and religious law.

Please send short cv, paper title, and a 200-word abstract for a 15-minute presentation to David Pan (dtpan@uci.edu) with “2013 Telos Conference” in subject line by October 15, 2012.

David Pan
European Languages and Studies
University of California, Irvine
Irvine, CA 92697
949-824-4363
Email: dtpan@uci.edu
Visit the website