CFP: “Boundaries: Real and Imagined”Southern Humanities Council Conference

Call for Papers – of interest for the those on the group dealing with the binary relationship of secularism (atheism, non-religion) and religion.

Southern Humanities Council Conference

January 31-February 3, 2013

The Hilton Savannah Desoto, Savannah, Georgia

“Boundaries: Real and Imagined”
The 2013 Southern Humanities Council Conference invites proposals for papers on the theme “Boundaries: Real and Imagined.” The topic is interdisciplinary and invites proposals from all disciplines and areas of study, as well as creative pieces including but not limited to performance, music, art, and literature.

Send proposals of 300-500 words to Mark Ledbetter at shcouncil@gmail.com or if sending by U.S. Postal Service, Mark Ledbetter, Executive Director, SHC, Box 2546, The College of St. Rose, 432 Western Avenue, Albany, NY 12203. If possible, send all proposals by email. Proposals are due by December 15, 2012.

The conference registration fee is $100.00 or $85 for unaffiliated scholars and graduate students. Membership in SHC is $30.00 or $15 for unaffiliated scholars and graduate students. Conference participants must pay membership and registration to attend and/or present at SHC. You may visit our website at http://southernhumanities.ning.com/. Topics are not limited to but may address any of the following areas. Pairings are not intended to imply binary thought, but rather to suggest a tradition of boundaries, real and imagined, for your considerations.

“Boundaries: Real and Imagined”
Sexuality Culture
Geography East and West
Gender Social Class
Race/Ethnicity Performance
The Academy/Disciplines Religion/Science
Humanities/Science Poetry
Fiction/Non-Fiction Memory/History
Body/Soul Music
Virtues/Vices Love/Lust
Pleasure/Pain Pleasure/Desire
Art Self/Other
Human/Animal Human Beings/Machine
Sacred/Secular Longing/Restraint/Constraint

CFP: Socrel / HEA Teaching and Studying Religion, 2nd Annual Symposium

Socrel / HEA Teaching and Studying Religion, 2nd Annual Symposium

Call for Papers Deadline 15 September 2012

The 2012 Socrel / HEA Teaching and Studying Religion symposium will explore the theme: Religion and Citizenship: Re-Thinking the Boundaries of Religion and the Secular.

The symposium is organised by Socrel, the BSA Sociology of Religion Study Group, with funding from the Higher Education Academy, Philosophy, and Religious Studies Subject Centre. Last year’s inaugural symposium was over-subscribed and therefore early submissions are encouraged.

Keynote speaker: Dr Nasar Meer, Northumbria University

Venue: BSA Meeting Room, Imperial Wharf, London

Date: 13 December 2012

10 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Religions today are implicated in a wide variety of publics. From contests over the environment and democracy to protests against capitalism, religions remain important factors in political and public life across diverse, and interconnected, global contexts. A variety of diverse responses have been articulated to the so-called ‘return of religion’ in the public sphere, drawing into question relations between the religious, the non-religious and the secular. As scholars have developed new theoretical understandings of the terms of these debates and questioned how these are bound up with cultural conceptualizations of citizenship, education – in schools, universities and less formal educational contexts – has often been a site where contestations of the religious and the secular have been acutely felt.

The aim of this symposium is to consider the interrelation between conceptions of the religious, the secular, citizenship and education, and to explore how these issues affect the study of religion in higher education. We hope to attract presentations of sufficient quality to lead to an edited publication.

The day will be highly participative and engaged. The symposium will be organised as a single stream so that the day is as much about discussion as it is about presentation, and therefore the number of formal papers will be limited.

Papers are invited from students, teachers, and researchers in the disciplines of sociology, anthropology, geography, theology, history, psychology, political science, religious studies and others where religion is taught and studied. Empirical, methodological, and theoretical papers are welcomed.

Presenters will circulate a five-page summary of their paper before the day so that all participants can come prepared for discussion. Presentations will last 10 minutes and will be structured into three sessions, each followed by a discussant drawing out key points. The day will conclude with a discussant-led, focused panel discussion.

Key questions to be addressed may include, but are not limited to:

  • What are the relationships between the religious, the secular and the public sphere, and how do these affect the study of religion, in both universities and schools?
  • How do different historical constructions of religion and secularity shape understandings of the civil sphere and citizenship, and what are the implications of this for the study of religion?
  • Does the increased public visibility of religion in national and global contexts affect how we study it?
  • What is the role of religious education (school and/or university) in forming citizens and shaping understandings of citizenship?
  • Are there distinct regional, national or international conceptions of the secular?
  • Are there distinct regional, national or international conceptions of citizenship?
  • How do different disciplines approach and study these conceptions, and what are the advantages and disadvantages of these approaches?

Abstracts of 200 words are invited by September 15 2012. Please send these to: Dr Paul-François Tremlett p.f.tremlett@open.ac.uk

Costs: £36.00 for BSA/SocRel members; £45.00 for non-members; £20.00 for SocRel/BSA Postgraduate members; £25.00 for Postgraduate non-members.

CFP: Socrel / HEA Teaching and Studying Religion, 2nd Annual Symposium

Call for Papers

The 2012 Socrel / HEA Teaching and Studying Religion symposium will explore the theme: Religion and Citizenship: Re-Thinking the Boundaries of Religion and the Secular.

The symposium is organised by Socrel, the BSA Sociology of Religion Study Group, with funding from the Higher Education Academy, Philosophy, and Religious Studies Subject Centre. Last year’s inaugural symposium was over-subscribed and therefore early submissions are encouraged.

Keynote speaker: Dr Nasar Meer, Northumbria University

Venue: BSA Meeting Room, Imperial Wharf, London
Date: 13 December 2012
10 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Religions today are implicated in a wide variety of publics. From contests over the environment and democracy to protests against capitalism, religions remain important factors in political and public life across diverse, and interconnected, global contexts. A variety of diverse responses have been articulated to the so-called ‘return of religion’ in the public sphere, drawing into question relations between the religious, the non-religious and the secular. As scholars have developed new theoretical understandings of the terms of these debates and questioned how these are bound up with cultural conceptualizations of citizenship, education – in schools, universities and less formal educational contexts – has often been a site where contestations of the religious and the secular have been acutely felt.

The aim of this symposium is to consider the interrelation between conceptions of the religious, the secular, citizenship and education, and to explore how these issues affect the study of religion in higher education. We hope to attract presentations of sufficient quality to lead to an edited publication.

The day will be highly participative and engaged. The symposium will be organised as a single stream so that the day is as much about discussion as it is about presentation, and therefore the number of formal papers will be limited.

Papers are invited from students, teachers, and researchers in the disciplines of sociology, anthropology, geography, theology, history, psychology, political science, religious studies and others where religion is taught and studied. Empirical, methodological, and theoretical papers are welcomed.

Presenters will circulate a five-page summary of their paper before the day so that all participants can come prepared for discussion. Presentations will last 10 minutes and will be structured into three sessions, each followed by a discussant drawing out key points. The day will conclude with a discussant-led, focused panel discussion.

Key questions to be addressed may include, but are not limited to:
What are the relationships between the religious, the secular and the public sphere, and how do these affect the study of religion, in both universities and schools?
How do different historical constructions of religion and secularity shape understandings of the civil sphere and citizenship, and what are the implications of this for the study of religion?
Does the increased public visibility of religion in national and global contexts affect how we study it?
What is the role of religious education (school and/or university) in forming citizens and shaping understandings of citizenship?
Are there distinct regional, national or international conceptions of the secular?
Are there distinct regional, national or international conceptions of citizenship?
How do different disciplines approach and study these conceptions, and what are the advantages and disadvantages of these approaches?

Abstracts of 200 words are invited by September 15 2012. Please send these to: Dr Paul-François Tremlett p.f.tremlett@open.ac.uk

Costs: £36.00 for BSA/SocRel members; £45.00 for non-members; £20.00 for SocRel/BSA Postgraduate member; £25.00 for Postgraduate non-members.

Event: “The Power of the Sacred and the Secular” 14-16 August 2012

Registration for the Aboagora symposium closes on 15th June!

ABOAGORA – BETWEEN ARTS AND SCIENCES

Turku, 14-16 August 2012

Aboagora is an event that promotes dialogue between the arts, humanities and sciences, and aims at challenging and breaking boundaries between arts and the scholarly world. The programme consists of workshops, keynote lectures and concerts. Aboagora is a joint effort by the Turku Music Festival, the Department of Cultural History at the University of Turku and the Donner Institute, Åbo Akademi University.

“The Power of the Sacred and the Secular”

The theme for 2012 focuses on a process that is fundamental to Western culture, that of separation between sacral and secular culture. This opens a fruitful perspective on the dialogue between the arts and the academia, since the concept of the secular is vigorously debated in both fields. In 2012 Aboagora seeks to turn critical attention to such questions as the role of religion in contemporary society, the return of mysticism and spirituality to public discussion and the so-called post-secular. In special focus are the issues of power and religion in relation to questions of gender and sexuality, sacred and secular love, Medieval inquisition, cinema and architectural space, cognitive science and quantum physics.

Keynote speakers include Gianni Vattimo (Philosophy, Italy), Miri Rubin (History, UK), Marion Bowman (Religious Studies, UK) and Juhani Pallasmaa (Architecture, Finland)

The workshop members include Kari Enqvist (Physics), Ilkka Pyysiäinen (Religious Studies), Sabrina Maniscalco (Physics), Andrew Yip (Sociology), Salla Tuori (Gender Studies), Elina Pirjatanniemi (Human Rights), Peter Nynäs (Religious Studies), Benjamin Zeller (Religious Studies), Terhi Utriainen (Religious Studies), Erik Steinskog (Music Studies), Tom Linkinen (Cultural History), Reima Välimäki (Cultural History) and Pekka Tolonen (Religious Studies).

For full programme and online registration please visit http://www.aboagora.fi.

The registration fee for the symposium is 30 € (for students 20 €). It includes participation for all keynote lectures, admission to all workshops, three lunches at Hus Lindman and coffee/tea with small snacks during coffee breaks. Registration closes on 15 June.

WELCOME!

Asko Nivala
Coordinator
Department of Cultural History
FI-20014 University of Turku
FINLAND

Phone +358 (0)2 333 6294
Email: aeniva@utu.fi
Visit the website at http://aboagora.fi

Publication: Is There a Crisis of Secularism in Western Europe?

Please see below for details of an electronic advance publication of Tariq Modood’s talk at the the annual conference at Chester SocRel.  On a personal note I can attest to how thought provoking and insightful I found this lecture, Modood invites comments and it would be interesting to hear people’s thoughts via the NSRN-Discuss.

2011 Paul Hanly Furfey Lecture

Is There a Crisis of Secularism in Western Europe?

Tariq Modood
Sociology of Religion 2012

CFP: The International Conference on Media, Religion, and Culture 8-12 July 2012

Please see details below of  The International Conference on Media, Religion, and Culture of particular interest to the network is the thread Media and The Boundaries of the Religious and the Secular

 

Call for papers deadline: April 15th,2012

There has been great interest to the conference and there are still requests for submitting abstracts.

Local committee decided to extend the deadline for abstract submissions until April 15, 2012.

There will be a great religious sites tour all around Turkey after the conference.

Please use nezihorhon@gmail.com for abstract submissions.

 

 

The International Conference on Media, Religion, and Culture, organized every two years by the International Society for Media, Religion, and Culture, invites papers for its July 8-12, 2012 conference to be held in Eskisehir, Turkey (outside of Istanbul), at Anadolu University.

In contemporary societies, electronic media such as smart mobile phones, satellite television, radio, and laptop computers have become ubiquitous. Although historians point out that world religions have always been mediated by culture in some way, people have incorporated these electronic media into everyday practices, and industries and state organizations have arisen to profit from those practices, in ways that are unprecedented. Today’s media can connect people and ideas with one another, but they also foster misunderstandings and reinforce societal divisions. They may provide the means for the centralization of religious authority, or the means to undermine it. Scholars of religion, as well as scholars of media and of culture, must consider how these various societal institutions of the media interact with one another and with systems of religion, governance, and cultural practices, as our societies demand better means by which to understand emergent concerns in an increasingly interconnected, globalized context.

The contemporary location of Turkey has long been the meeting place between Eastern and Western culture, religion, trade, and communication. This conference provides a crossroads for scholars, doctoral students, media professionals, and religious leaders from a variety of religious and secular traditions to meet and exchange ideas. Interdisciplinary scholarship is welcome, as is comparative work, theoretical development, and in-depth ethnographic studies that shed light on contemporary phenomena at the intersection of media, religion, and culture.

Papers, panels, workshops, and roundtable proposals could address, but should not be limited to:

 

* Global and Glocal Media and Religion(s)

* Mediation and Mediatization of Religion

* Media and The Boundaries of the Religious and the Secular

* Media, Power, Religion and Democracy

* Religion and Visual Expression

* Crossroads of Old/New Media and Religion

* Religion, Gender and Media

* Dialogue/Conflict: Media and Religion

* Islam and Media/ Islamic Media

* Social Media, Religion and Cultures

 

Presentation Formats

This year we will be accepting proposals in four formats: papers, panels, workshops and roundtables.

Panels bring together in discussion four participants or presentations representing a range of ideas and projects. Roundtables may include more individuals who comment on a common theme in briefer formats.

Panels and roundtables are scheduled for 90 minutes and should include a mix of individuals working in areas of research, theory, and practice. We also encourage the use of discussants.

Workshops provide an opportunity for hands-on exploration and/or project development. They can be organized around a core challenge that participants come together to work on or around a tool, platform, or concept. Workshops are scheduled for 90 minutes and should be highly participatory.

Forthcoming publications

Please see details below of a number of forthcoming publications in 2012

Natural Burial: Traditional-Secular Spiritualities and Funeral Innovation

Hannah Rumble and Douglas Davies

26th July 2012

“Co-authored with Prof Douglas Davies in the Dept. for Theology and Religion, University of Durham.
From the 1990s the British developed an interest in natural burial, also known as woodland, green, or eco-logical burial. This continued a stream of British interest in funeral innovation from Victorian cemetery monuments through the birth and rise of cremation to the many things done with cremated remains. The book sets natural burial in the context of creative dealing with death, grief, mourning and the celebration of life. Ideas from sociology and anthropology combine with psychological issues and theological ideas to show how human emotions take shape and help people think of their own death as well as dealing with death of those they love.

Douglas Davies and Hannah Rumble explore the variety of motivations for the appeal of natural burial, and use interviews with people using a special natural burial site created by the Church of England but open to all, to illustrate the spiritual understandings of life and death in the sacred, secular and mixed worlds of modern Britain.”

This book is the outcome of the AHRC-ESRC Collaborative doctoral award and will be published by Continuum in July 2012. This joint volume offers a spectrum of anthropological and theological interpretation of people’s choice of woodland burial while also raising numerous theoretical issues pivoting around ideas of ‘giving something back’ and ‘not making a fuss’, as well as the more anticipated issues of ecology

Making Sense of the Secular: Critical Perspectives from Europe to Asia
Edited by Ranjan Ghosh

1st October 2012

This book offers a wide range of critical perspectives on how secularism unfolds and has been made sense of across Europe and Asia. The book evaluates secularism as it exists today – its formations and discontents within contemporary discourses of power, terror, religion and cosmopolitanism – and the focus on these two continents gives critical attention to recent political and cultural developments where secularism and multiculturalism have impinged in deeply problematical ways, raising bristling ideological debates within the functioning of modern state bureaucracies.

Examining issues as controversial as the state of Islam in Europe and China’s encounters with religion, secularism, and modernization provides incisive and broader perspectives on how we negotiate secularism within the contemporary threats of terrorism and other forms of fundamentalism and state-politics. However, amidst the discussions of various versions of secularism in different countries and cultural contexts, this book also raises several other issues relevant to the antitheocratic and theocratic alike, such as: Is secularism is merely a nonreligious establishment? Is secularism a kind of cultural war? How is it related to “terror”? The book at once makes sense of secularism across cultural, religious, and national borders and puts several relevant issues on the anvil for further investigations and understanding.

Europe’s Encounter with Islam: The Secular and the Postsecular
Luca Mavelli

12 March 2012

In the last few years, the Muslim presence in Europe has been increasingly perceived as ‘problematic’. Events such as the French ban on headscarves in public schools, the publication of the so-called ‘Danish cartoons’, and the speech of Pope Benedict XVI at the University of Regensburg have hit the front pages of newspapers the world over, and prompted a number of scholarly debates on Muslims’ capacity to comply with the seemingly neutral and pluralistic rules of European secularity.

Luca Mavelli argues that this perspective has prevented an in-depth reflection on the limits of Europe’s secular tradition and its role in Europe’s conflictual encounter with Islam. Through an original reading of Michel Foucault’s spiritual notion of knowledge and an engagement with key thinkers, from Thomas Aquinas to Jurgën Habermas, Mavelli articulates a contending genealogy of European secularity. While not denying the latter’s achievements in terms of pluralism and autonomy, he suggests that Europe’s secular tradition has also contributed to forms of isolation, which translate into Europe’s incapacity to perceive its encounter with Islam as an opportunity rather than a threat.

Drawing on this theoretical perspective, Mavelli offers a contending account of some of the most important recent controversies surrounding Islam in Europe and investigates the ‘postsecular’ as a normative model to engage with the tensions at the heart of European secularity. Finally, he advances the possibility of a Europe willing to reconsider its established secular narratives which may identify in the encounter with Islam an opportunity to flourish and cultivate its democratic qualities and postnational commitments.

This work will be of great interest to students and scholars of religion and international relations, social and political theory, and Islam in Europe.

Post-Secularism, Realism and Transcendence: Explorations of the Utopian Content of the Religious Condition
Jolyon Agar

30 July 2012

This project addresses the recent rise in post-secularism in the humanities and social sciences. Post-secularism is the proposition that the secular project begun by the Enlightenment has come to an end. If we define secularism as the historical process of increasing marginalisation of the religious from contributing to debates in the public sphere and the process of public policy formation then it is in crisis. This opens up the intriguing possibility that there may be opportunities for renewed debate about the nature of our “secular age” and the role of religion in modern society. Evidence for such a renewal of the religious may be found in the alarming rise of religious fundamentalism in the late 20th and early 21st Centuries, especially in the Islamic world and the United States, the resurgence of Catholic conservatism under Pope John Paul II and Pope Benedict XVI or the increasing popularity of more esoterical quasi-religious New Ageism.

This book will be of great interest to those scholars currently working in the area of post-secularism (a very popular area of research in political philosophy); Hegelian and Marxist scholars; the Critical Realist community. It will also be of interest to undergraduates and postgraduates taking courses in Utopian Marxism, Critical Theory, Critical Realism, post-Hegelian German philosophy, philosophy of religion and the interface between political philosophy and religion.

Religious Experience: A Reader
Edited by Craig Martin, Russell T. McCutcheon
Introduction by  Leslie Dorrough Smith

Many regard religious experience as the essence of religion, arguing that narratives might be created and rituals invented but that these are always secondary to the original experience itself. However, the concept of “experience” has come under increasing fire from a range of critics and theorists. This Reader presents writings from both those who assume the existence and possible universality of religious experience and those who question the very rhetoric of “experience”.

Bringing together both classic and contemporary writings, the Reader showcases differing disciplinary approaches to the study of religious experience: philosophy, literary and cultural theory, history, psychology, anthropology; feminist theory; as well as writings from within religious studies. The essays are structured into pairs, with each essay separately introduced with information on its historical and intellectual context.

The ultimate aim of the Reader is to enable students to explore religious experience as rhetoric created to authorize social identities. The book will be an invaluable introduction to the key ideas and approaches for students of Religion, as well as Sociology and Anthropology.

CONTRIBUTORS: Robert Desjarlais, Diana Eck, William James, Craig Martin, Russell T. McCutcheon, Wayne Proudfoot, Robert Sharf, Ann Taves, Charles Taylor, Joachim Wach, Joan Wallach Scott, Raymond Williams

Event: Booking now open, Prophecy in the New Millennium: When Prophecies Persist Saturday 12 May 2012

Prophecy in the New MillenniumProgramme

Booking form

Please see details of the event “PROPHECY IN THE NEW MILLENNIUM: When Prophecies Persist”. Alongside general interest, the network may find Wendy Grossman’s Panel “Chasing the Horizon: Prophecy in Secular Contexts” particularly relevant.

INFORM Seminar XLVIII

PROPHECY IN THE NEW MILLENNIUM:
When Prophecies Persist

Wolfson Theatre, New Academic Building, 
London School of Economics, Saturday 12 May 2012
http://www.lse.ac.uk/resources/mapsAndDirections/howToGetToLSE.htm

To register: WE ARE NOW TAKING PAYPAL BOOKINGS: http://inform.ac/node/1550
Or post a booking form (attached) and a cheque payable to ‘Inform’ to Inform, Houghton St., London WC2A 2AE. (Inform@lse.ac.uk; 020 7955 7677).

Tickets (including buffet lunch, coffee and tea) paid by 16 April 2012 cost  £38 each (£18 students/unwaged).

NB. Tickets booked after 16 April 2012 will cost £48 each (£28 students/unwaged).

A limited number of seats will be made available to A-Level students at £10 before 16 April 2012 (£20 after 16 April). A party of 5 or more A-Level students from one school can include one member of staff at the same price.

PROVISIONAL PROGRAMME

The presence of speakers on an Inform programme does not mean that Inform endorses their position. 

The aim of Inform Seminars is to help participants to understand, or at least recognise, different perspectives.

For Inform’s codes of practice see www.Inform.ac

 

9.30-10.00   Registration

10.00-10.10 Professor Eileen Barker (Professor, LSE; Chair & Honorary Director, Inform) Welcome

10.10-10.20 Dr Suzanne Newcombe and Sarah Harvey (Research Officers, Inform) Introduction

10.20-10.45 Dr Simon Dein (UCL and University of Durham) “Prophecy: Social Scientific Perspectives”

10.45-11.10 Sheila Tremlett (former member of the Worldwide Church of God) “To a Place of Safety? The Elect in the Great Tribulation”

11.10-11.35 Coffee

11.35-12.00 Dr Hugh Beattie (The Open University) “The Mahdi and the End-Times in Islam”

12.00-12.25 Abi Freeman (mid-lifer) “Living in the Time of the End”

12.25-13.00 Group Discussions

13.00-14.00 Lunch

14.00-14.25 Andrew Fergus Wilson (University of Derby) “From the Mushrooms to the Stars: 2012 and the Apocalyptic Milieu”

14.25-14.50 Kevin Whitesides (PhD Candidate, University of Edinburgh) “New Age: (Still) Doing What it Says on the Tin”

14.50-15.15 David G. Robertson (PhD Candidate, University of Edinburgh) “(Always) Living in the End Times: The “Rolling Prophecy” of the Conspiracy Milieu”

15.15-15.40 Tea

15.40-16.05 Wendy Grossman (freelance writer and founder of The Skeptic Magazine) “Chasing the Horizon: Prophecy in Secular Contexts”

16.05-16.30 Professor Gordon Melton (Baylor University and founder and Director of the Institute for the Study of American Religion)

Looking into the Future: Why Prophecies Will Persist”

16.30-17.00 Panel Discussion

CFP: Alternative Salvations, 18 September 2012

Space for secular and non-religious readings of salvation, particularly for those working in a variety of Christian cultural contexts.
One Day Conference, Sept 18th 2012, University of Chester

The conference will explore how ‘unorthodox’ readings of sacred texts inform salvation experience; how life
transformations outside of religious contexts might be considered spiritual; how ideas of this-worldly salvation
are politicised; how ideas of salvation are simultaneously secularised and infused with new power; what alternative salvations can be discovered within Christianity and how might they be practised? In particular, we are seeking to  explore the ways that alternative religious, spiritual and secular understandings of the notion of salvation already shape, and have the potential to shape, how people live and act in Christian and post-Christian contexts .

This exciting conference breaks new ground in exploring alternative approaches to salvation. Proposals for
short papers are invited on any aspect of the theme of ‘alternative salvations’ as outlined here. Papers will normally be 20 minutes in length with an additional 10 minutes for discussion. Applications to submit a short paper should include:
• Proposer’s name and affiliation
• a title for the paper
• a 200 word abstract
• Details of any audio-visual equipment you will need to deliver your paper
Short paper proposals should be submitted to alternativesalvations@chester.ac.uk by no later than 4:00pm on 16th April 2012.

Applicants should know the outcome of their proposal by 18th May 2012.
Conference costs: £28 (£18 for unwaged and students) inclusive of lunch and refreshments.

If you would like any further information, please contact: alternativesalvations@chester.ac.uk