CFP: Pilgrimage to the Heart of the Sacred The Sacred Journeys: Pilgrimage and Beyond Project

Call for Presentations

The Sacred Journeys: Pilgrimage and Beyond Project: 2nd Global Meeting

Friday 3rd July – Sunday 5th July 2015
Mansfield College, Oxford, United Kingdom


Call for Presentations:
Pilgrimage is a cross-cultural phenomenon that facilitates interaction between and among diverse peoples from countless cultures and walks of life. In the 2nd Global Conference, we will continue to explore the many personal, interpersonal, intercultural, and international dimensions of this profound phenomenon.

Among the key issues that emerged from Sacred Journeys I: Pilgrimage and Beyond, were:

1. Definition of Pilgrimage:
‘Travel for transformation’ embraces the sacred journey as a potential turning point in one’s life. Witness the avalanche of books by pilgrims who have experienced the Camino, or those who have been influenced by the transformation of others, like Malcolm X.  After his experience of the Hajj pilgrimage, the activist was stirred to reevaluate his lifelong journey in search of justice and reconciliation as well as his thinking regarding race relations in the United States. Questions arise as to how and when a journey becomes ‘sacred’ and how and when pilgrimage devolves into a mere tourist endeavor.  Does tourism merely observe the authentic in others, whereas pilgrimage seeks it for oneself?

2. Reinforcing the Vision of the Ultimate Unity of Humanity:
Pilgrimage scholar George Greenia’s insight that ‘pilgrimages generate the least violent mass public gatherings [that] humankind has designed for itself’ inspires the question: In what ways can the concept of the sacred journey lend itself to envisioning a world united in difference?  We can reflect, for instance, on the sacred journey to Adam’s Peak in Sri Lanka, a site of interfaith and intercultural pilgrimage interpreted differently by various pilgrim sects. For Buddhists, a sacred footprint in a rock formation is said to belong to Buddha, whereas for Hindus, it is deemed to be Shiva’s footprint, and for Muslims and Christians, it is thought to be Adam’s. This pilgrimage site provides a powerful example of interfaith cooperation.

3. Pilgrimage and Globalization:
The global playing field is leveling and technology is impacting pilgrims in innumerable ways. In Mecca, for instance, telephone ‘apps’ assist Hajj pilgrims searching for animals for sacrifice; in Lourdes, another ‘app’ provides details on miraculous healings, proudly declaring, ‘A miracle could happen’ during the pilgrim’s visit. Infrastructural and support services are also improving, and jour­neys once thought to be too diffi­cult or challenging, such as that to Amarnath in India, are now within reach of vast numbers of pilgrims. Will modern conveniences alter traditional experiences, create entirely new ones, or both?

4. Modernization and the Global Trend Towards the Dissolution of Traditional Ways:
Pilgrims cling to what they ascertain as familiar and reaffirm what they believe to be ‘true’ at local levels. There may be a growing awareness that ‘the world is one’ and that we must work together to deal with our common ecological, political, and security problems, but in the interest of cultural survival, primordial standard-bearers like nation, tribe, and race have been reified and re-energized; for instance, journeys of all persuasions are now being undertaken along ancient pathways that have been rediscovered and/or redeveloped. What kinds of trends along these lines might we forecast for the future?

5. Secular Pilgrimage:
Major secular pilgrimage sites, such as to Abbey Road in London, or to Elvis Presley’s home ‘Graceland’, or Jim Morrison’s (The Doors) grave site in Paris, attract astonishing numbers of ‘pilgrims’. What are the similarities and differences between sacred and secular pilgrimages? More and more we are living in a ‘global village’ and the ‘pilgrimage in my front room’ phenomenon is facilitated by video and satellite links. These changes raise the question: must pilgrimages, whether sacred or secular, always involve a physical journey ‘in league’ with others? Virtual or alternative pilgrimages are important topics for consideration; so, too, are related online experiences that recreate the pilgrimage or tourism experience in a virtual world.

In light of our broad exploration, and these new directions, we would also welcome proposals that might take into consideration the following:

* New definitions of sacred and secular pilgrimage, and the question of authenticity.
* How historical perspectives on the meaning(s) of pilgrimages and motives for travel are changing over time.
* The metaphor of ‘the journey’ as explored by writers, artists, performers and singers, including humanists, agnostics, atheists and musicians.
* The notion of journeying toward ‘salvation’.
* Pilgrimage and ‘miracles’ and the related topic of thanksgiving.
* The post-pilgrimage experience (which can be non-religious and/or secular, involving, for instance devotional exercises, meditation practices, mental journeys, etc).
* ‘Dark’ pilgrimages to sites of remembrance and commemoration (i.e., the Hiroshima Peace Museum, the Irish National Famine Museum, Rwanda genocide memorials, etc.).

The Steering Group welcomes the submission of proposals for short workshops, practitioner-based activities, performances, and pre-formed panels. We particularly welcome short film screenings; photographic essays; installations; interactive talks and alternative presentation styles that encourage engagement.

What to Send:
Proposals will also be considered on any related theme. 300 word proposals should be submitted by Friday 13th March 2015. If a proposal is accepted for the conference, a full draft paper of no more than 3000 words should be submitted by Friday 22nd May 2015. Proposals should be submitted simultaneously to both Organising Chairs; proposals may be in Word or RTF formats with the following information and in this order:

a) author(s), b) affiliation as you would like it to appear in programme, c) email address, d) title of proposal, e) body of proposal, f) up to 10 keywords.
E-mails should be entitled: Sacred Journeys 2 Proposal Submission.

All abstracts will be at least double blind peer reviewed. Please use plain text (Times Roman 12) and abstain from using footnotes and any special formatting, characters or emphasis (such as bold, italics or underline). We acknowledge receipt and answer to all proposals submitted. If you do not receive a reply from us in a week you should assume we did not receive your proposal; it might be lost in cyberspace! We suggest, then, to look for an alternative electronic route or resend.

Organising Chairs:
Ian McIntosh: imcintos@iupui.edu
Eileen Moore Quinn: quinne@cofc.edu
Rob Fisher: sj2@inter-disciplinary.net

The conference is part of the Persons series of ongoing research and publications projects conferences, run within the Probing the Boundaries domain which aims to bring together people from different areas and interests to share ideas and explore innovative and challenging routes of intellectual and academic exploration. All proposals accepted for and presented at the conference must be in English and will be eligible for publication in an ISBN eBook.  Selected proposals may be developed for publication in a themed hard copy volume(s). All publications from the conference will require editors, to be chosen from interested delegates from the conference.

Inter-Disciplinary.Net believes it is a mark of personal courtesy and professional respect to your colleagues that all delegates should attend for the full duration of the meeting. If you are unable to make this commitment, please do not submit an abstract for presentation.

Please note: Inter-Disciplinary.Net is a not-for-profit network and we are not in a position to be able to assist with conference travel or subsistence.

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CFP: The European Conference on Ethics, Religion and Philosophy 2015

The European Conference on Ethics, Religion and Philosophy 2015

Thistle Brighton, Brighton, East Sussex, United Kingdom

Monday, July 6, 2015 – Wednesday, July 8, 2015 (All Day)

Abstract Submission Deadline: March 1, 2015 

Registration Deadline for Presenters: June 1, 2015

Abstract Submission Process: In order to present at the conference, your abstract must first pass a double blind peer review. Upon payment of registration fees, your presentation will be confirmed.

  • Results of abstract reviews returned to authors: Usually within two weeks of submission
  • Full paper submission: August 1, 2015

How to Submit


Ways to Present

Individual Presenter (30 minutes)The standard format for presentation — oral presentations are thirty minutes in length.Poster Presenter (90 minutes)Posters allow presenters to reach a large audience and engage interested participants directly. These sessions give participants a chance to network with other delegates who may be interested in similar research or other disciplines.Virtual Presenter. Some presenters will be unable to make the trip to the UK to present their paper, mainly due to financial and/or political restrictions on travel. Virtual presentations allow authors the same publication opportunities as regular presenters.

  • We do not allow presentations by video-conferencing but presenters have the opportunity to submit a video of their presentation, which will be placed on the official YouTube channel. Information on how to do this will be sent following registration.
  • Following the conference you will be mailed a conference pack, including a printed receipt of payment, certificate of participation, and a printed copy of the conference programme.

Workshop (60 to 90 minutes) A workshop is a brief intensive course lasting 60 to 90 minutes led by an experienced practitioner, usually someone with a PhD. It emphasises group interaction and the exchange of information usually amongst a smaller number of participants than at a plenary session.Often a workshop involves problem solving, skills training, or the dissemination of new content or disciplinary approaches. Conference workshops are typically more instructional and interactive in nature than oral presentations and involve participants working with the workshop leader on a particular topical issue.Panel (90 minutes) As the organiser of a proposed panel, submit a proposal for the panel through the online system.

  • Panels must have at least four participants (including the chair).
  • All the panel participants must be listed in the submission, with the chair leader as the primary author, and the other presenters as co-authors.
  • If your proposal is accepted you will be invited to register for the conference. Please ensure that you send the submission reference number to the other members of your panel and have them register in a timely fashion. Upon payment of the registration fee of all participants, your panel will be scheduled in the conference programme.
  • If you, as the panel chair, wish to publish a joint paper associated with the panel in the conference proceedings, please upload one through the online system.
  • If you and your panel members wish to publish separate papers, they may register individually and submit their proposals for review.

Conference Theme and Streams

Conference Theme: “Power

The conference theme is “Power” and the organizers encourage submissions that approach this theme from a variety of perspectives. However, the submission of other topics for consideration is welcome and we also encourage sessions within and across a variety of disciplines and fields related to Ethics, Religion and Philosophy, including the following streams:

Philosophy:

  • Philosophy and Religion
  • Philosophy and the Arts
  • Philosophy and Public Policy
  • Philosophy and Technology
  • Philosophy and Culture
  • Philosophy and Education
  • Philosophy and Peace Studies
  • Comparative Philosophy
  • Linguistics, Language and Philosophy

Ethics:

  • Medical Ethics
  • Business and Management Ethics
  • Ethics in Education
  • Ethics, Law, and Justice
  • Ethics and Globalization
  • Ethics and Science
  • Comparative Ethics
  • Linguistics, Language and Ethics

Religion:

  • Theism and Atheism
  • Feminism and Religious Traditions
  • Religion and Education
  • Religion and Peace Studies
  • Mysticism, Faith, and Scientific Culture
  • Interfaith Dialogue
  • Comparative Religion
  • Linguistics, Language and Religion

Interdisciplinary:

  • Conflict Resolution and Mediation Studies

For further information – please see the ECERP2015: Call For Papers website.

CFP: Old religion and new spirituality: continuity and changes in the background of secularization

Research group of religious studies of the Centre of Excellence in Cultural Theory (Estonia) announces a call for papers for its conference:

Old religion and new spirituality: continuity and changes in the background of secularization

University of Tartu, Estonia

26-29 May 2015

Estonia is an extremely secularized European country, characterized by the diminishing institutionalization of religion (de-institutionalization) and the decline of the Christian practices and beliefs (de-Christianization). In order to investigate the historical roots of the situation and clarify the characteristics of the current picture, the research project about religiosity in Estonia was started in 2011. The staff of the project welcomes the researchers dealing with the religious situation in various regions and countries of Europe in order to make comparisons of certain features of the changing religious landscape. Papers that address contemporary developments or provide a historical perspective will be accepted.

Particularly interesting aspects may include:

– historical process of secularization, its specific features in different countries;

– combinations of religion and nationalism, effects of nationalism on public religion;

– changes in the traditional religious groups and churches in 21st century;

– atheism and nonreligion, their organized and individual manifestations;

– new spirituality, “New Age” and individual religiousness, mixed forms of organized and individual religion.

Invited speakers include: Stephen Bullivant (St Mary’s University, Twickenham), Abby Day (University of Kent), Paul Heelas (Erasmus University Rotterdam), Detlef Pollack (University of Münster).

The language of the conference is English. The length of papers: 20 minutes. A conference fee €80 will be applied for meals and materials, the participants are expected to pay for their travel and accommodation. The organizers plan to publish a selection of papers.

Please send abstracts of papers of 250-300 words to the conference e-mail: orns@ut.ee before 01.01.2015.

Pre-arranged panels are to be considered as well.

Notification of acceptance and opening of the registration: 01.02.2015.

For further inquiries you may also contact Riho Altnurme: riho.altnurme@ut.ee

Constantly updated information about the conference can be found at: http://orns.ut.ee/

Event: World Religions Conference

34th World Religions Conference

28 September 2014

River Run Centre, Guelph, Ontario, Canada

The World Religions Conference (WRC) is a multi-faith event which brings together well-known scholars from the world’s major religions and philosophical traditions (including Aboriginal Spirituality, Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Sikhism, and Humanism/Atheism) to speak on a common topic from the point of view of their respective religious traditions. While this is not an academic conference or a call for academic papers, this event may be of interest to those working in nonreligion and secularityContinue reading

CFP: Sociology of Religion Study Group (Socrel) Annual Conference 2015

Sociology of Religion: Foundations and Futures

Sociology of Religion Study Group (Socrel) Annual Conference www.socrel.org.uk

Date of Conference: Tuesday 7 – Thursday 9 July 2015 hosted by Kingston University London High Leigh Conference Centre, Hoddesdon, Hertfordshire, UK http://www.cct.org.uk/high-leigh/introduction 

Deadline for abstracts and panel proposals: December 1, 2014.

Keynote Speakers:

Professor Nancy T. Ammerman (Boston University)

Professor James Beckford (University of Warwick)

Professor Grace Davie (University of Exeter)

Professor David Martin (London School of Economics)

Professor Linda Woodhead (Lancaster University)

Since its foundation in 1975, the Sociology of Religion Study Group has become one of the largest in the British Sociological Association (BSA). Its membership includes educators and researchers from across the UK and internationally, and in 2015 the Sociology of Religion Study Group will be celebrating 40 years!

Given this occasion, it is an opportune moment to reflect on religion in society, and religion in sociology. From its foundation, Socrel has foregrounded research on secularisation, gender, spiritualities, embodied and lived accounts, materiality, generational innovations, atheism, social difference, migration, institutions, politicised expressions and methodologies in the study of religion. While this list does not account for all the many ways scholars have been investigating religion in social life – its various forms, intersections and spaces – it does speak to how religions continue to be important subjective and collective experiences that are stable and continuous, resistant and shifting. This conference will bring together scholars who have shaped and are shaping the discipline. It will be an opportunity to pay heed, not only to the Study Group’s and discipline’s accomplishments, but also an opportunity to address questions that still need answering, and questions that are emerging to inform future agendas and areas of concern and study, such as:
 
– What are the key points of continuity and innovation in theorising religion? 
– How are methodologies emerging and informing research on religion? 
– How are new approaches adapting and transforming old practices? 
– What are the key controversies that will occupy sociologists of religion? 
– What are the pedagogical challenges and innovations in teaching the sociology of religion? 

We invite you to celebrate with us by engaging in the conference questions from your particular area of research in the Sociology of Religion. 

Abstracts for individual papers (250 words max.) and panel proposals (500 words max.) are invited by 1 December 2014. Panels may take a standard 20-minute paper format or take alternative modes such as pre-circulated papers/work in progress/or ‘points of view’ that are 10-minutes long. Submissions should be made in Word format and include in the following order: Name, institutional affiliation, email address and paper title.

**All presenters must be members of Socrel.
Abstracts will be subject to peer review. Please note, presenters will be limited to one paper per person at the conference, but you may also organise a panel. 

-Abstract submissions open: 1 September 2014 -Early bird registration opens: 1 September 2014 -Abstract submissions close: 1 December 2014 -Decision notification: 15 January 2015 -Presenter registration closes: 16 March 2015 -Draft programme online: 16 April 2015 -Early bird registration closes:  11 May 2015 -Registration closes: 15 June 2015 

Please send abstracts to the attention of the conference organisers:
Dr Sylvie Collins-Mayo (Kingston University London) and Dr Sonya Sharma (Kingston University London) at: socrel2015@gmail.com  

Should you have other questions about the conference please also contact the conference organisers at the above email address.

Online Registration: http://portal.britsoc.co.uk/public/event/eventBooking.aspx?id=EVT10391 

A limited number of bursaries are available to support postgraduate, early career, low income or unwaged Socrel members to present at the conference. Please visit www.socrel.org.uk for instructions, and to download an application form, and submit your bursary application along with your abstract by 1 December 2014.

Socrel is the British Sociological Association’s study group on Religion. For more details about the study group and conference please visit www.socrel.org.uk.

CFP: Secularism and Secularity – American Academy of Religion (AAR) Annual Meeting

CFP: Secularism and Secularity – American Academy of Religion  (AAR) Annual Meeting

Over the course of the last few decades, theoretical reappraisals of the secular have tried in a variety of ways to destabilize and revalue the notion of the secular so that it no longer means simply the “absence of religion.” Yet vernacular uses of the secular frequently continue to orbit around that very understanding. With this in mind, we invite proposals for papers or panels that explore “the secular” at its various sites of construction. In concert with this year’s conference theme, we are particularly interested in proposals that critically engage public understandings of secularism as well as those that investigate the constitution of the secular in religiously plural publics, in multiple identity formations (especially among the so-called religious “nones”), and in and through a range of social practices (for example, those related to death and dying). In addition, for a possible cosponsored session with the Death, Dying, and Beyond Group, we seek proposals on secular approaches to death.

To submit a paper proposal please follow the instructions on the AAR website found here. All proposals must be submitted no later than March 1 March 4, 2013.

Questions can be directed to the program unit co-chairs (Per Smith and Jonathan VanAntwerpen) at secularism.secularity@gmail.com

UPDATE – The AAR has extended its deadline for proposals to Monday, March 4th.

CFP: Is the Post-Colonial Secular?

Conference in Syracuse, NY
September 20-21, 2013

Description and Call for Papers:

Across the humanities, critical scholarship on the secular / secularism / secularization has recently ballooned. Scholars of history, anthropology, political theory, and religion have begun revisiting questions of enchantment and disenchantment, political theology, blasphemy, religious freedom, and much more. Charles Taylor’s A Secular Age in particular has garnered wide attention, but Taylor’s narrative focuses on the disenchantment of modern Christian Europe. Before and after A Secular Age, scholars have probed the boundaries of the secular beyond Christian Europe, and beyond the confines of intellectual history.

Some have asserted that the ideologies of secularism and colonialism are deeply intertwined. Others have asserted that post-colonial religiosity remains a symptom of colonial control of reason and affect. Still others have pointed to neo-liberalism as the shared basis of contemporary racial, religious, and post-colonial regimes.

We invite proposals that probe the question, “Is the Post-Colonial Post-Secular?” Projects may employ methods of history, literary criticism, theoretical reflection, ethnography, or cultural studies. We are interested in projects from a variety of regions and periods, for example contemporary Africa, the early U.S., or nineteenth century Haiti.

Please send 300 word abstracts, or questions, to: Owais Khan (mokhan01@syr.edu) and Vincent Lloyd (vwlloyd@syr.edu).
Deadline for abstracts: March 25; Notification: April 10.

CONFIRMED SPEAKERS: 
Gauri Viswanathan (Columbia, Literature)
Barnor Hesse (Northwestern, African American Studies)
Pamela Klassen (Toronto, Religion)
Uday Mehta (CUNY, Political Science)
Matthew Engelke (LSE, Anthropology)
Gyanendra Pandey (Emory, History)
Ludger Viefhues-Bailey (Philosophy, Le Moyne)

This symposium is sponsored by the Syracuse University Religion Department in cooperation with Le Moyne College.

CFP: Religion and Society in Central and Eastern Europe (RASCEE)

RASCEE

Religion & Society in Central and Eastern Europe – Journal of the International Study of Religion in Eastern and Central Europe Association (ISORECEA) | ISSN: 1553-9962 http://www.rascee.net

Religion and Society in Central and Eastern Europe (RASCEE) is an open-access peer-reviewed annual (published in December) academic journal reflecting critical scholarship in the study religion in the region. Journal Religion and Society in Central and Eastern Europe is included in Index to the Study of Religions Online (A cross-searchable database and bibliography of journal articles) and in EBSCO Publishing – Academic Search Complete, SocIndex with Full Text and in Central and Eastern European Academic Source., while it is in the review process with Religious and Theological Abstracts, ATLA Religion Databases and ProQuest.

Call for papers

RELIGION IN THE SOCIETIES OF FORMER SOVIET UNION TERRITORIES:ROLES, MANIFESTATIONS AND TRANSFORMATIONS In the early 1990s the territories of the former Soviet Union opened up to social and religious innovations. After generations of nurturing the idea of a homogenous society, different states emerged,some of them with homogenous, and some of them with heterogeneous, religious fields, with different ways of living and coping with the new conditions of religious freedom, and with different conceptions of the role of religion in society. Looking back after two decades, we can state that religion in the territories of the former Soviet Union has undergone transformations: from forced secularization, to offering new roles, and having a variety of manifestations within contemporary societies that are marked by modernization, individualization and globalization. Is it possible to talk about a religious revival or not? What are the roles of religion in post-Soviet societies? What are the manifestations of new forms of religiosity? How has religion been transformed and mutated in the last two decades? Which religions have been successful and which have failed?Throughout this period a new generation of social scientists and humanities scholars have grown up,and we are particularly interested in their interpretations of the social situation in the region. How does the new generation of scholars understand and interpret the roles, manifestations and transformations of religion in the former Soviet Union?

Religion and Society in Central and Eastern Europe invites submissions for a special issue dedicated to religion in the former Soviet Union. We welcome both empirical and theoretical contributions from diverse areas of the social sciences, such as: sociology, anthropology, political science, religious studies, history and law, and that focus on the post-Soviet religious landscape and its post-Communist transformations.

Religion and Society in Central and Eastern Europe (RASCEE) is an annual, open-access, peer-reviewedacademic journal that reflects critical scholarship in the study of religion in the region.

Language: English

Website for the submission of articles: http://www.rascee.net/index.php/rascee

Deadline: June 1, 2013

Contact: Milda Alisauskiene at m.alisauskiene@smf.vdu.lt, or Annika Hvithamar ahvit@sdu.dk

CFP: Global Secularisms at NYU, Due 3/31

Call For Papers

Global Secularisms

The Global Liberal Studies Program at New York University is currently seeking paper submissions for its inaugural conference on the topic of Global Secularisms — to be held on November 15 and 16, 2013 in New York, NY.

From a global perspective, Western secularism, and for example the American debate regarding the separation of church and state, appear as very parochial issues. Secularism is a vexed topic with global implications and consequences, affecting virtually every part of the world, every nation state and every culture, traditional or modern. Questions related to secularism have become increasingly urgent and involve enormous real-world implications. From the emergence of the “new atheism,” to battles over shariah law in Europe and the Middle East, to the reemergence of religion in the politics of India, to battles over the authority of science in the United States, to struggles both intellectual and political over the shape of the public sphere, the question of secularism proves critical.

Some scholars question the assumption that the modern social order is undergoing, or indeed has ever undergone, the process of secularization; others hold that we have entered a post-secular era. Still others associate secularism with western cultural, social, economic or political hegemony. And on the other hand, some of the most compelling thinkers insist that secularism is the only possible means of negotiating sectarian strife and establishing and maintaining a democratic state. Equating secularism with the rejection of the transcendent, secular humanists insist that secularism is the best way to achieve real human flourishing. Yet the very meanings of the words “secularism” and “religion” have been questioned. The history of secularism — and the word should be made plural — helps define the crises of our moment. This conference returns to these issues, in the light of these recent discussions and of recent events that are having serious effects on the way we live now, on the shape of global politics and culture for the immediate future.

This conference hopes to appeal to scholars and creative authors from the major divisions of the academy, including the humanities, social sciences, and sciences, as well as to independent scholars and writers from outside of the academy. We welcome engagement with questions involving secularism and the arts, culture, economics, history, international relations, religion, philosophy, politics, and science. Among the possible broad areas that papers might address, we offer the following possibilities:

  • Secularist movements/figures, past and present
  • Secularism and/as religion
  • Secularism and the arts, literature
  • Secularism and human flourishing
  • Secularism and the state
  • Anti-secularism, anti-atheism
  • Secularism and imperialism
  • Secularism and rights
  • Secularism in colonial/postcolonial contexts
  • The secularization of knowledge, science
  • The secularization of culture
  • The secularization of the university
  • Secularism and feminism
  • Post-secularism

Please email abstracts of 150-300 words by March 31, 2013 to:
Dr. Michael Rectenwald (michael.rectenwald@nyu.edu)

The conference steering committee will respond to submissions by June 1, 2013.

Tomorrow: LSE Forum on Religion, featuring Audra Mitchell and Stacey Gutkowski

LONDON SCHOOL OF ECONOMICS

DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY – Programme for the Study of Religion and Non-religion

FORUM ON RELIGION

Date: Wednesday, 23 January 2013
Time: 16.30-18.00
Venue: Seligman Library (OLD 6.05), Old Building, LSE

Speakers:


Audra Mitchell (University of York)
‘Bringing Secularity (Back) into International Relations: Immanence, Agency and Intervention’

and

Stacey Gutkowski (King’s College London, Middle East and Mediterranean Studies Programme)
‘Secular Ways of War’

 

http://www2.lse.ac.uk/anthropology/research/PRNR/Events/events.aspx